egypt
AR
belarus
BE
bulgaria
BG
bangladesh
BN
bosnia
BS
spain
CA
czech_republic
CS
germany
DE
greece
EL
usa
EM
great_britain
EN
esperanto
EO
spain
ES
estonia
ET
iran
FA
finnland
FI
france
FR
israel
HE
croatia
HR
hungary
HU
indonesia
ID
italy
IT
japan
JA
georgia
KA
india
KN
south_korea
KO
lithuania
LT
latvia
LV
india
MR
netherlands
NL
norway
NN
india
PA
poland
PL
portugal
PT
brazil
PX
romania
RO
russia
RU
slovakia
SK
serbia
SR
sweden
SV
ukraine
UK
vietnam
VI
china
ZH

Language change

The world in which we live changes every day. As a result, our language can never stagnate. It continues to develop with us and is therefore dynamic. This change can affect all areas of a language. That is to say, it can apply to various aspects. Phonological change affects the sound system of a language. With semantic change, the meaning of words change. Lexical change involves changes to vocabulary. Grammatical change alters grammatical structures. The reasons for linguistic change are varied. Often economic reasons exist. Speakers or writers want to save time or effort. Such being the case, they simplify their speech. Innovations can also promote language change. That is the case, for instance, when new things are invented. These things need names, so new words emerge. Language change is typically not planned. It is a natural process and often happens automatically. But speakers can also vary their language quite consciously. They do that when they want to achieve a certain effect. The influence of foreign languages also promotes language change. This becomes particularly obvious in times of globalization. The English language influences other languages more than any other. You can find English words in almost every language. They are called Anglicisms. Language change has been criticized or feared since ancient times. At the same time, language change is a positive sign. Because it proves: Our language is alive – just like us!

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